Students to present research at Wellspring Symposium

By: For The Record
The Old Well Spring in the center of campus stands on the site of a fresh-water spring that attracted Wingate’s founders to the location in 1896. Its four bowls symbolize Wingate’s growth from a grade school to a junior college, to a college and now a university.

More than two dozen Wingate University students will take to the podium this week to share their research. And nearly twice that many will present posters explaining what they’ve learned.

“The 2018 Wellspring Symposium is a multidisciplinary showcase of student creations, community engagement endeavors, research and innovations during this academic year,” said Marisa Ciesluk, the University’s dean of academic enrichment programs.

Oral presentation topics will include everything from “Women’s Suffrage in North Carolina” and “Women in the Bible” to the “Function of Plyometrics in Athletics.”

Five speeches and eight posters will deal with injuries and rehabilitation. Seven posters illustrate research involving animals, including turtles, bats and sheep. And at least four focus on various aspects of the controversial opioid kratom. About a dozen students, in teams of three, will present findings on the topic of “Homelessness, Health and LGBTQ Youth.”

Formerly called the Creative & Investigative Partnerships Symposium, the two-day event has a new name this year that links it to the University’s history. The Old Well Spring in the center of campus stands on the site of a fresh-water spring that attracted Wingate’s founders to the location in 1896. Its four bowls symbolize Wingate’s growth from a grade school to a junior college, to a college and now a university.

“The Wellspring is symbolic to our beloved University, but it also represents so many other things. It is a place of continual and abundant supply. It is a place where folks can come to be refreshed, gain knowledge, grow and replenish their thirst for curiosity,” Ciesluk said.

She sees the symposium as a way to celebrate the inspirational work that students are doing and to honor the faculty who have mentored them.

“I want the Wellspring to be a place where students can reflect on their W’Engage and W’International experiences, as well as their internships, but also pitch their entrepreneurial ideas and share their innovations from the science lab or the elementary education classroom where they completed student teaching,” Ciesluk added.

Several of those inspired students who hope to inspire others with their research this week are from the Union and Anson area.

In fact, Hunter Edwards, a senior from Unionville, will kick off the symposium with his oral presentation, “Spirituality in the Wake of Plague.”

Peachland junior Gabriela Cabrera will present a poster on “Those Who Invoked, Refuted, and Maneuvered: A History of the ‘Son of Sam’ Laws,” while Connor Correll, a junior from Monroe will share his research on “Cybersecurity, Hacking and E-Voting.” Also from Monroe, Kaylan McCain will present a poster titled “Garden Soil Produces Effective Antibiotics.”

Abigail Valenta, a senior from Weddington, will give a lecture on the “Impact of Note-Taking Style on Academic Performance.”

“Special Characteristics of the A-Call and New Call in the Chinese Blue-breasted Quail,” will be the topic of Waxhaw junior Lauren Pharr. Senior Kelly Manning, also from Waxhaw, will report on “True Interest or Ability to Persevere? Preliminary Analysis of the Relationship Between Intrinsic Motivation and Grit and Success in First Year Science Courses.”

Katelyn Lliso of Matthews, a senior, will share what she and her research partner, Danielle Wolfe, learned about “Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in Athletic Injury.”

Two Marshville residents, Nolan Martin and Chandler Williams, both juniors, are also part of the symposium. Williams’ poster is about his research on the “Evaluation of AMPK on Breast Cancer Cell Invasion and Migration,” while Martin has done a case study evaluating “Bilateral Exertional Compartment Syndrome.”

Kelsie Driggers, a sophomore from Wingate, is among the group presenting on LGBTQ youth.

Wellspring Symposium oral presentations will begin at 8 a.m. and continue all day Wednesday at various locations on campus. Thursday’s lectures start at 2 p.m. Poster presentations, taking place in the Batte Center Rotunda, begin at 4 p.m. Wednesday. On Thursday, they shift to LaVerne Banquet Hall and begin at 12:30 p.m.

The symposium is open to the public. For a complete schedule, email l.williams@wingate.edu.

The Old Well Spring in the center of campus stands on the site of a fresh-water spring that attracted Wingate’s founders to the location in 1896. Its four bowls symbolize Wingate’s growth from a grade school to a junior college, to a college and now a university.
https://ansonrecord.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/web1_wingatewellspring.jpgThe Old Well Spring in the center of campus stands on the site of a fresh-water spring that attracted Wingate’s founders to the location in 1896. Its four bowls symbolize Wingate’s growth from a grade school to a junior college, to a college and now a university.

For The Record